Veterans Marker for Bernard Doran, Sr., (1890-1947) – Military Monday

Bernard Doran's Military Marker - photograph by Maryann Barnes

Bernard Doran’s Military Marker – photograph by Maryann Barnes

Bernard Doran was born on the 21st of February 1890 in Belfast, County Antrim, Northern Ireland and died 11 April 1947 in Harrison, Hudson County, New Jersey. My grandfather, who was called Barney by his family, served in the New Jersey National Guard, 1st Infantry, Company M, as a Private. After emigrating to the United States, he had enlisted on 6 April 1914 and was discharged on 26 May 1917. He often told stories to his family about the Mexican Border War. From what I remember, my grandmother didn’t want him going off to Europe to fight in World War One, because by then they were married and had their first child.

Application for Military Marker for Bernard Doran

Application for Military Marker for Bernard Doran

The application for his marker is on ancestry.com in the database, U.S. Headstone Applications for Military Veterans, 1925-1963.  Here you can see the correction for his birthdate, but it still was done with the wrong date. With many of the military records destroyed in the fire at the National Archives at St. Louis in 1973, it is wonderful to see these images. They are a way to reconstruct the dates of military service for family members, and also find out the section and unit of the U.S. Armed Forces.

Appplication for Bernard Doran - reverse side of card.

Application for Bernard Doran – reverse side of card.

The reverse side of the card shows that my grandfather did report for service for World War I. From the date of the approved application of 16 April 1948, and the stamp of 21 May 1848, I know that these next two photographs of my grandmother at the cemetery were taken after that date.

Mary Mahoney Doran with her son, James, and daughter-in-law, Mary, at Holy Cross Cemetery.

Mary Mahoney Doran with her son, James, and daughter-in-law, Mary, at Holy Cross Cemetery. Copyright Genealogy Sisters 2016.

Mary Mahoney Doran with her son, Billy. Photograph copyright Genealogy Sisters 2016.

Mary Mahoney Doran with her son, Billy, at Holy Cross Cemetery, North Arlington, NJ. Photograph copyright Genealogy Sisters 2016.

Later a gravestone was installed where the military marker had earlier been installed, shown in these two photographs above, and the military marker was moved up a few feet.

Doran gravestone at Holy Cross Cemetery. Copyright Genealogy Sisters 2016.

Doran gravestone at Holy Cross Cemetery. Copyright Genealogy Sisters 2016.

The Roman Catholic Cemeteries in the Newark Diocese, New Jersey can be searched online. Here is the listing for my grandfather ~ Bernard Doran Sr. was buried on 04/14/1947 at the Holy Cross Cemetery in Blk-70 Sec-B Tr-D Gr-8 1A.  Source: http://www.rcancem.org/find-a-loved-one-search/

Good luck searching! Military Monday is a blogging post suggested by GeneaBloggers.

Copyright 2016 by Maryann Barnes and Genealogy Sisters.

Source Information:

Ancestry.com. U.S., Headstone Applications for Military Veterans, 1925-1963 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.

Original data: Applications for Headstones for U.S. Military Veterans, 1925-1941. Microfilm publication M1916, 134 rolls. ARC ID: 596118. Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General, Record Group 92. National Archives at Washington, D.C.

Applications for Headstones, compiled 01/01/1925 – 06/30/1970, documenting the period ca. 1776 – 1970 ARC: 596118. Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General, 1774–1985, Record Group 92. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C.

Posted in Blog Prompt Series, Cemeteries, Doran, Family Names, Grandparents, Holy Cross Cemetery, Military, Military Monday, New Jersey National Guard, Research, World War One | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Camp Gordon, Georgia – 12th Infantry, Company “I” – World War Two

Original photograph taken by Lenard Parke, Photographers, Augusta, GA. From the photograph collection of James F. Doran.

Company “I” 12th Infantry, Camp Gordon, GA. Original photograph taken by Lenard Parke, Photographers, Augusta, GA. From the WWII photograph collection of James F. Doran.

“The 12th Infantry Regiment was reorganized as a Motorized Infantry Regiment on 29 September 1942. Less than a year later, on 1 August 1943, the 12th was reorganized as a standard infantry regiment when the 4th Division was converted from motorized to dismounted infantry. The 12th Regiment along with the rest of the 4th Infantry Division arrived in England on 29 January 1944. On D-Day, 6 June 1944, the 12th Infantry saw its first action of the war when, as part of the 4th Infantry Division, it spearheaded the assault landing on Utah Beach.” Source: Wikipedia, 12 Infantry Regiment (United States).

Here are the sections scanned in for closer detail. Please click on any image to enlarge it.

CampGordan4

Upper left of photograph.

CampGordan2

Center of photograph.

CampGordan3

Top right of photograph.

The bottom half of the photograph is below.

CampGordan6

Bottom left of photograph.

Section from Company I, 12th Infantry, Camp Gordan, GA.

Center bottom section from Company I, 12th Infantry, Camp Gordon, GA with list of names.

Bottom right of photograph.

Bottom right of photograph.

The center section of the photograph lists the names of the men serving in Company I of the 12th Infantry Regiment of the 4th IVY Division, during World War II. The original photo is 31 inches by 13 inches, and is taped in sections, and is undated. This photograph was saved by James F. Doran. He landed on Utah Beach on D-Day and was severely wounded two days later on 8 June 1944. After recovery, he served for the duration of the war as a Military Policeman in France. He was one of the Greatest Generation.

Fort Gordon Garrison History   ~  Camp Gordon, named for Confederate Lieutenant General John Brown Gordon, was activated for infantry and armor training during World War II. During the war, its 55,000 acres served as a divisional training base for the 4th and 26th Infantry Divisions and the 10th Armored Division that fought in Europe in General George S. Patton’s Third Army. (The inactivated 10th Armored Division still calls Fort Gordon home). After World War II, more than 85,000 officers and enlisted personnel were discharged from Camp Gordon’s Army Personnel Center. Other facilities included a U.S. Disciplinary Barracks and, beginning in 1943, a prisoner of war camp for German and Italian World War II captives.” Source: http://www.gordon.army.mil/garrison_old/history.htm

Thank you to all the brave men and women that served during World War II, and every day, so that we have freedom.

Copyright 2016 by Maryann Barnes and Genealogy Sisters.

Posted in 4th "Ivy" Division of the United States Army, Augusta, Doran, Family Names, Fort Gordon, Georgia, In Memoriam, Leonard Parke, Locations, Military, North America, Photographers, Research | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Six Word Saturday – 13 August 2016

Some of my favorite swimming holes . . .

Darts Mill - 1960

Darts Mill – 1960

One of my favorite swimming holes when I was a child was Darts Mill, in Readington Township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. This was along the South Branch of the Raritan River. I have the look of hurry up and take the picture!

Darts Mill - 28 June 1960 - Doran Siblings

Darts Mill – 28 June 1960 – Doran Siblings

I was surprised to hear that my sister-in-law, Cindy, had gone there with her family as a child. How neat to think we all may have played together. It was always fun to not only splash around, but to go under the bridges where the river ran and to catch minnows.

"Summer 1962 - Rockaway - Mountainville"

“Summer 1962 – Rockaway – Mountainville”

Rockaway Creek, in Tewksbury Township, Hunterdon County was a local swimming hole that some of our neighbors also went to. The creek had been damned up and it had some nice large rocks to play on. I’m the little one on the right with the “water wings” on.

When I was a little older, I would go to Round Valley Reservoir, in Lebanon, NJ. It was formed in the early 1960s after a series of significant droughts, in a natural valley with Cushetunk Mountain. This photo was from before it officially opened. Later I would bring my own children there. Tuesdays were free then, and also after 6 p.m.

Round Valley, NJ. With my dear sister, Veronica.

Round Valley, NJ, with my dear sister, Veronica.

Mountain Lake, in Liberty Township, Warren County was another great place for a swim. In this photo below you can see the beach area with the dock we would swim out to. I was the weakest swimmer of my siblings, but I did manage to get out that far.

Mountain Lake, NJ - Enjoying the swings!

Mountain Lake, NJ – Enjoying the lake and the swings!

Swimming holes never have chlorine added to the water, and are usually free, or just have a nominal fee to get in. They are great places during the hot sultry days of summer. Now we swim for free at the lake we live on in Virginia.

What are some of your favorite swimming holes?

Take a look at Cate’s blog at Show My Face for more Six Word Saturday postings.

Copyright 2016 by Maryann Barnes and Genealogy Sisters.

Posted in Blog Prompt Series, Doran, Family Names, Family Traditions, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, North America, Six Word Saturday | Tagged , , , | 9 Comments